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Caney Fork History, The Battle of Rock Island 1792 or 1793?

Caney Fork History, The Battle of Rock Island 1792 or 1793?

The Battle of Rock Island – November 9, 1793*
*Other sources give differing dates
Excerpt from: The Caney Fork of the Cumberland
Rock Island Battle – Pages 6-8

“The Battle of Rock Island, though small in many respects, was important as it marked the end of Indian warfare in Middle Tennessee and was one of the last engagements in Tennessee. The battle occurred on the right bank [when facing downstream] of the Caney Fork River across from the Island and a short distance South of the Old Stone Fort. Three accounts of the battle have been recorded by historians. They follow along with some notes by the writer.

Reminiscences of Snoddy’s Fight, November 1793
(From Capt. Wm. Reid, of Sumner Co., Tenn. about 79 in 1844.) Draper Mss. 323 490-493.

Lieut. Wm. Snoddy mustered into service, at Winchester’s Mill, 32 men in all — my informant, being one of the number. Went and camped that night at Dixon’s Spring; next day Nathaniel Lattimore killed a bear; third day marched to Caney Fork — Wm. Reid pilot — just as they were in the act of crossing the stream, talking pretty loudly, they saw two Indian sentinels jump up apparently awakened from sleep, and ran off. The men dashed across and soon discovered the Indian camp in alarm and confusion, all the Indians dashed off and over into an island in the river, called the Double or Rock Island. The Indians, in their haste, left their plunder, and while the whites were gathering the articles, John Peyton called out that the Indians were surrounding them — one Indian only was seen, and he darted off. Then the men treed along the bank of the river for a hour or more, thinking they would be attacked. The plunder was then gathered up — 62 packs were taken, each containing a blanket, lead, a piece of bear skin to lie on — one shot gun — 2 Spanish blades, bridles and halters. Went up a little distance to the top of the ridge from the river, and camped — tied the horses and had the plunder in a pile and the horses around it. The Indians, commanded by Doublehead, were on the island; and Doublehead was heard to make a loud howl, and then make a talk to his warriors. The poorest horse in the company was then hoppled out and belled, and grass pulled and placed before him, and occasionally some one would go out and give the bell a ring — this was designed as a trap for the Indians. Sentinels were placed out; and finally the Indians came up around the camp, but kept at some distance off, and imitated owls and other birds -“

To read more: The Caney Fork of the Cumberland







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